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most learned discourse on early modern Europe

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How did one go about visiting Versailles for an extended period around the time of Louis XIV? Were letters of introduction needed or was there a different way of going about it? Also, was there a head of household at Court (or something similar) in charge of these things? Thanks for your help
Current Location:
21st century
humour:
curious
musick:
Girl with a Pearl Earring sound track
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So the other day I was driving around with my sisters, listening to the Albion Band, and one of the songs on that particular album had an undue emphasis on horns. (Erm. Like, the kind that deer have, not the musical kind.) One of my sisters asked me what the point of this was, and I explained that it was a cuckoldry joke, the idea being that cuckolds supposedly have horns, and that you see this joke a lot in early modern culture.

"But why do cuckolds have horns?" she asked. And it occurred to me that I have no idea -- I've read enough Shakespeare by now that the idea is completely familiar, but I have no idea where it comes from. So why do cuckolds have horns? Anyone know?

humour:
curious
musick:
Toronto Consort -- "Quant ce beau printemps je voy"
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So in my last thread in this community, I asked people to answer three questions in one word. I'll admit that they were all trick questions designed to illustrate the following points:

1. An audience to Merchant of Venice has a very complex relationship with Shylock; our feelings towards him depend on the scene that we are watching and its framing.*

2. An audience has very divided loyalties in the scene where Marc Antony and Brutus deliver their respective speeches. On the one hand, up until this scene, Brutus is the play's de facto protagonist (i.e. the character that delivers monologues to us and the character that is played by the leading actor in the troupe). But, of course, Marc Antony delivers the better speech -- a speech that successfully sways the play's mob, which is an obvious analogue for the mob that is concurrently assembled in a playhouse to watch Julius Caesar.

3. Hamlet continuously behaves as though Christian ethics were somehow compatible with the morality of revenge tragedy. For instance, the Ghost asks Hamlet to revenge his murder in literally the same breath that he demands that his son leave Gertrude to heaven. And consider the various ways that the play considers suicide, and the way in which its final scene darts between varied systems of ethics.**

Thesis: if F. Scott Fitzgerald is correct in saying that the mark of a first-rate mind is its ability to hold contradictory ideas at the same time -- and I believe that he is -- then Shakespeare's plays are vehicles for the production of first-rate minds.


* for more on this, check out "Meaning and The Merchant of Venice" by Norman Rabkin (cf. Rabkin, Norman. Shakespeare and the Problem of Meaning. Chicago: University of Chicago Press, 1981.)

** for more on this, check out Stephen Booth's essay "On The Value of Hamlet" (cf. Booth, Stephen. "On The Value of Hamlet." Reinterpretations of Elizabethan Drama. Ed. Norman Rabkin. New York: Columbia University Press, 1969. 137-176.)
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Can anybody answer any of the following questions in one word only?

1. Does an audience to The Merchant of Venice sympathize with Shylock?
2. In the "friends, Romans, countrymen" scene of Julius Caesar, which character does the audience most identify with?
3. Is Hamlet a Christian play?

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Hi there - I'm fantasizing about building my library, and adding masses upon masses of books to my Amazon wishlist. While these books may never be purchased, in the event that some benevolent being should stumble upon my wishlist and buy everything on it for me, I'd like to have the right editions. So:

Which do you recommend for:
- Ben Jonson (plays, individual or collected... and if there's any edition of the complete masques that doesn't cost a bajillion dollars, I'd love to know about it.)
- Paradise Lost
- The Faerie Queene

And if you have any other recommendations, for anyone from Lyly to Aphra Behn, why, feel free to let me know.

Note: I'm looking for something like the Arden Shakespeare, with intelligent notes and variants, and smart, efficient Extra Matter. No Nortonian masses of "criticism," no Riverside spareness of comment.

Thanks in advance!

humour:
quixotic
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I'm trying to sell a fairly accurate Renaissance gown ensemble. I don't know if anyone here attends events at which such costumes are needed, but I thought I'd drop the line anyway in case, for some odd reason, it's precisely what someone has been looking for.
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Hello. I am new, and since I've already started posting, I thought I should  introduce myself.
 
 
This seems like a great community and I really look forward to participating!
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I'm entering a Masters program in the Fall, and I'd like to do Something Serious to revive my proficiency in Latin before I get there and enroll in a Latin course. I think with a little work I could enter an advanced intermediate class, but it's been so long since I've studied it that I'm worried I'll bomb a placement exam and be put back in beginning. Unfortunately, the intensive summer language programs are not an option, financially, so it's going to have to be a book of some kind. Any suggestions?

Thanks,
A

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I was told by one of my professors to sign up for a listserv because they are extremely helpful. However this prof could not give me the name of a good Renaissance listserv since she is an 18th century scholar. I googled them and came up with hundreds of different titles and links, which was a bit overwhelming.

Can you guys suggest a reputable listserv for Renaissance studies (emphasis in Shakespeare, gender studies, new historicism, masculine studies, sexuality studies, and others)? Or even a directory of Renaissance listserves would be helpful. Thanks in advance.

JP

humour:
curious
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